The New Economy of Abundant Information

Knowledge workers –lawyers, clinicians, teachers, researchers, consultants etc.- have always operated under the paradigm of knowledge scarcity. Many years of education channeled information to them, enabling each to become an expert in their respective field. Once educated, professionals share their knowledge and expertise, but at a price. What happens to their professions when information is no longer scarce, but abundantly available?

Scary Ideas

This add of GE says it all. Ideas are scary, messy, and fragile, but under the proper care, they become something beautiful.

Underserved Legal Markets

In spite of being the largest market for Legal services, the US is also considered one of the world’s largest underserved legal markets. It is estimated that 50% of the middle income households have at least one legal problem, with only 20% seeking legal assistance, and 26% doing nothing at all. The numbers for underserved small and midsize organizations are estimated to be similar. Underserved markets typically offer opportunities for disruptive innovation.

Idea Generation in Professional Service Organizations

The Organizing4Innovation Idea Generation Webinar explains what the idea generation phase of the innovation process entails for professional service organizations. The Idea Generation stage is the first stage of any innovation project. It is both important and time-consuming, because only during this phase do you have maximum flexibility to get your solution right. Executing changes in your concept at a later stage is more difficult and expensive. While making changes and iterations may not seem to you like progress, in terms of learning you will discover that you are in fact advancing in leaps and bounds during this phase.

5 Myths About Disruption

What is disruptive innovation? Clayton Christensen defined it as a cheaper, inferior, niche product that in a short period of time upends the entire market. Larry Downes and Paul Nunes, have a different opinion. In their view, disruptive innovations do not have to start as inferior, nor are necessarily linked to technology, making disruptive innovations an even greater threat to even more industries than ever before.

Stop Predicting Innovation Success!

Products are not successful, it is the people behind the scenes that make these products successful. Hence the efforts of innovators is a better indicator of where the product is going than the product itself. Thirty years of research has not made us better in predicting innovation success. To be more innovative, we need more people engaged in innovation, and be more stringent in the efforts they put in to validate their ideas.