Customer discovery for mature companies; 6 lessons-learned

When I coach, I am often asked, “do you think this is a good idea?”. My answer is always the same, “Does my opinion matter?”. It does not. Only your clients can tell you whether something is a good or bad idea. The process of customer discovery – to figure out what your clients need […]

New online course “How to get your idea approved” – looking for beta testers

At Organizing for Innovation, we recently created a new online course: How to get your idea approved. We are currently looking for beta testers who are willing to be the first participants to take the course. The target audience for the course The course is a 6-week online program, in which innovation champions in professional service organizations […]

100 customer interviews

Do 100 Customer Interviews Make Your Idea Better?

Absolutely! I had the pleasure to participate with the Bleed Freeze team in the NSF I-Corps program. The team did over 100 customer interviews, to finally nail the customer-value fit. The video shows their lessons learned from this experience.

Professional Service Innovation | Dos and donts

Innovation Management Dos and Don’ts

There are many names for the Innovation Management function in professional service firms. It can be identified as new business development or quality improvement, or hidden in the marketing department. How to make sure the innovation function—whatever it is called—enables innovation to thrive in your organization?

FISHStep Second Edition

The law firm Fish & Richardson launched the second edition of the FISHstep program January 9th. FISHstep is designed to enable startup companies to protect their intellectual property early in their formation. Learn more and apply now (Deadline is February, 2 2015)

Idea Generation in Professional Service Organizations

The Organizing4Innovation Idea Generation Webinar explains what the idea generation phase of the innovation process entails for professional service organizations. The Idea Generation stage is the first stage of any innovation project. It is both important and time-consuming, because only during this phase do you have maximum flexibility to get your solution right. Executing changes in your concept at a later stage is more difficult and expensive. While making changes and iterations may not seem to you like progress, in terms of learning you will discover that you are in fact advancing in leaps and bounds during this phase.

Stop Predicting Innovation Success!

Products are not successful, it is the people behind the scenes that make these products successful. Hence the efforts of innovators is a better indicator of where the product is going than the product itself. Thirty years of research has not made us better in predicting innovation success. To be more innovative, we need more people engaged in innovation, and be more stringent in the efforts they put in to validate their ideas.

Why Innovations Should Fail More Often

It is bad that 1 out of 10 innovation fail, but for another reason than you may think; The number of innovations that fail is too low. You need many more innovations to ensure success in the market place. We are focusing on the wrong metric. The metric used here is the number of projects that enter the innovation pipeline versus those that make to the marketplace and succeed. Over the years, the “best” companies have become very effective in trimming down the number of project in the early stages. However, what remains very difficult to predict is which projects to keep and which to discard. The chances of throwing away the child with the bathwater are significant.

Listen! Are You Ignoring Great Innovative Ideas?

25% Of ideas your employees voice are never listen too. While on the contrary, you will likely be willing to listen to any expensive outside experts, who will kindly tell you what your employees already knew. By the way, the more you pay, the more likely you will listen. The Washington Blog post: “The troubling flaws in how we select experts”, gives interesting insights in why we don’t listen to our own people, but are willing to follow the advice of (less qualified) experts. Unfortunately, this article does not provide a solution to the problem. In this blog we explain where to start to address this issue.